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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey

Glorious Architecture
This magnificent gothic construct is a sight to behold and the incredible stained glass is some of the most impressive in the UK.

Coronation Chair
Created for King Edward I in 1296, the chair has been the seat for the crowning of every monarch since 1308, including Queen Victoria and our current reigning Queen, HRH Elizabeth II. It is the oldest piece of furniture in the UK that is still used for its original intention.

Poets’ Corner
The literary corner of the Abbey is named due to the large amount of poets and writers buried there, including Geoffrey Chaucer, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling and Thomas Hardy, as well as many memorial stones and busts dedicated to the likes of Shakespeare and loved Scottish poet Robert Burns.

Kings and Queens
Westminster Abbey has been the coronation church since 1066 and seventeen monarchs are buried there. The Abbey was also the place where William and Kate tied the knot in 2011.

Find out More about Westminster Abbey

Hampton Court Palace – Standard Ticket

Hampton Court Palace – Standard Ticket

Hampton Court Palace has provided a luxurious retreat for many of Britain’s most famous Kings and Queens. Henry VIII was so inspired by it that he spent three of his honeymoons here. And visitors continue to escape to Britain’s greatest palace to experience its history, splendour and stunning scale.

Discover what it was really like to live and work at Hampton Court Palace. Take a fascinating journey through 500 years of royal history. Marvel at the impressive architecture and opulent interiors of the State Apartments and see the vast Tudor Kitchens in full swing. Enjoy the breathtaking Great Hall and Chapel Royal, and see how Sir Christopher Wren transformed the palace to rival Versailles. Take time to appreciate one of the finest collections of Renaissance paintings in Europe, and listen to tales of intrigue at the royal court from expert guides dressed in full historical costume. Or enjoy an audio tour, available in 9 languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Russian, Korean and Japanese. They can be collected from the Information Centre in Clock Court.

And that’s before you’ve even begun to explore the stunning riverside gardens where you’ll find the famous Maze and one of the world’s oldest vines.

‘Top Ten’ things to see and do at Hampton Court. These sights are ‘unmissable’
Access to these sights is included in your admission ticket, unless otherwise stated.

 

Henry VIII’s Great Hall

The Great Hall is England’s greatest medieval hall and one of Britain’s oldest theatres. William Shakespeare’s company performed there in 1603-4.

Young Henry VIII exhibition Meet the ‘pin-up’ prince, before he became fat old Henry VIII, at our Young Henry VIII exhibition (included in your admission ticket). The exhibition includes paintings and interactive displays.
 

The world famous Maze

Test yourself and get enjoyably lost in ‘the most famous Maze in the history of the world’. Entry is included in your ‘All Palace and Gardens’ admission ticket. A ‘Maze only’ entry is also available.
 

Tudor kitchens and live Tudor cookery

Built to feed the Court of Henry VIII, the kitchens were expected to provide meals for 600 people twice a day. See the kitchens today and experience the sights and smells of a real Tudor kitchen!
 

Baroque Palace

The splendid apartments of William and Mary who ruled jointly at the end of the 17th century are a beautiful and elegant reminder of the decadent Baroque period.  They offer tremendous views of the magnificent gardens in particular the King’s Privy Garden, designed to be viewed from the most sort after location the King’s Privy Chamber.  
 

The Cumberland Art Gallery

Discover magnificent artworks from The Royal Collection in the Cumberland Art Gallery. See a selection of The Royal Collection’s finest paintings: masterpieces by Holbein, van Dyck, Rembrandt, Caravaggio, Bassano and Gainsborough, and other artists who worked for, or were collected by, four centuries of royal patrons.
 

Beautiful gardens

Wander through over 60 acres of beautifully maintained and internationally celebrated gardens at Hampton Court Palace. Entry is included in your ‘All Palace and Gardens’ admission ticket.
 

Family fun activities

We have a wide range of activities and tours to entertain families. Choose from family trails, our world-famous maze, costumed guided tours, live Tudor cookery and much much more.

 

The Chapel Royal

This beautiful chapel has been in continuous use for over 450 years. Visitors are welcome to attend religious services at The Chapel Royal.

 

Tiltyard café – kids’ meal deal!

History makes you hungry! At the Tiltyard café, choose from any kid’s hot meal with lemonade or milk and a fairy cake for just £3.95. Deliciously great value.

Find out More about Hampton Court Palace – Standard Ticket

The State Rooms + The Queen’s Gallery

The State Rooms + The Queen’s Gallery

The State Rooms

Buckingham Palace serves as both the office and London residence of Her Majesty The Queen, as well as the administrative headquarters of the Royal Household. It is one of the few working royal palaces remaining in the world today. Today the Buckingham Palace State Rooms are used extensively by Her Majesty The Queen and Members of the Royal Family to receive and entertain their guests on State, ceremonial and official occasions. During August and September when The Queen makes her annual visit to Scotland, the Palace’s nineteen state rooms are open to visitors.

What there is to see?
The Buckingham Palace State Rooms form the heart of the working palace and are lavishly furnished with some of the greatest treasures from the Royal Collection – paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens, Poussin and Canaletto; sculpture by Canova; exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain; and some of the finest English and French furniture.

In celebration of The Queen’s 90th birthday, a special exhibition will be staged across each of Her Majesty’s official residences during 2016.

Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe (30 July – 25 September 2016)

The Garden
Described as a ‘walled oasis in the middle of London’, the Palace’s garden is home to thirty different species of bird and more than 350 different wild flowers, some extremely rare. Visitors end their tour with a walk along the south side of the garden, with splendid views of the west front of the Palace and the famous lake.

Audio Guide
An audio guide is included in the ticket price and is available in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese, Russian and Mandarin. There is also a family audio guide (in English only) and accompanying activity trail, suitable for children 7-11 years.

Changing of the Guard
The Changing of the Guard ceremony takes place at 11:30 daily from April until the end of July and on alternate days for the rest of the year, weather permitting. The new guards arrive at the forecourt of the Palace at 11:30 from Wellington Barracks. The journey takes about 5 minutes and the soldiers are accompanied by a band. The ceremony is conducted on the Palace forecourt and takes approximately forty minutes to complete.

[The Army have not yet released the schedule for July, August or September.]

Wheelchair Access
If you require wheelchair access or the use of the lift, you should not book with 365 Tickets.com and should pre-book tickets directly with Buckingham Palace.
Access booking line: 020 7766 7324 www.royalcollection.org.uk or email specialistsales@royalcollection.org.uk

Find out More about The State Rooms + The Queen’s Gallery

The State Rooms + Royal Mews

The State Rooms + Royal Mews

Buckingham Palace State Rooms

Buckingham Palace serves as both the office and London residence of Her Majesty The Queen, as well as the administrative headquarters of the Royal Household. It is one of the few working royal palaces remaining in the world today. Today the Buckingham Palace State Rooms are used extensively by Her Majesty The Queen and Members of the Royal Family to receive and entertain their guests on State, ceremonial and official occasions. During August and September when The Queen makes her annual visit to Scotland, the Palace’s nineteen state rooms are open to visitors.

What there is to see?
The Buckingham Palace State Rooms form the heart of the working palace and are lavishly furnished with some of the greatest treasures from the Royal Collection – paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens, Poussin and Canaletto; sculpture by Canova; exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain; and some of the finest English and French furniture.

In celebration of The Queen’s 90th birthday, a special exhibition will be staged across each of Her Majesty’s official residences during 2016.

Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe (30 July – 25 September 2016)

The Garden
Described as a ‘walled oasis in the middle of London’, the Palace’s garden is home to thirty different species of bird and more than 350 different wild flowers, some extremely rare. Visitors end their tour with a walk along the south side of the garden, with splendid views of the west front of the Palace and the famous lake.

Audio Guide
An audio guide is included in the ticket price and is available in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese, Russian and Mandarin. There is also a family audio guide (in English only) and accompanying activity trail, suitable for children 7-11 years.

Changing of the Guard
The Changing of the Guard ceremony takes place at 11:30 daily from April until the end of July and on alternate days for the rest of the year, weather permitting. The new guards arrive at the forecourt of the Palace at 11:30 from Wellington Barracks. The journey takes about 5 minutes and the soldiers are accompanied by a band. The ceremony is conducted on the Palace forecourt and takes approximately forty minutes to complete.

[The Army have not yet released the schedule for July, August or September.]

Wheelchair Access
If you require wheelchair access or the use of the lift, you should not book with 365 Tickets.com and should pre-book tickets directly with Buckingham Palace.
Access booking line: 020 7766 7324 www.royalcollection.org.uk or email specialistsales@royalcollection.org.uk

 

The Royal Mews

 

What there is to see?

One of the finest working stables in existence, the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace provides a unique insight into the department of the Royal Household that provides transport by road for The Queen and other members of the Royal Family. 

The Carriage Horses
During your visit to the Mews, you will see some of The Queen’s horses that draw the coaches and carriages in the Mews.

The Cleveland Bays are used to escort newly appointed High Commissioners and Ambassadors to their audience with The Queen, when they present their formal credentials from their country’s Head of State.

You may also see the famous Windsor Greys, so called because they were kept at Windsor during the reign of Queen Victoria and drew the private carriages of the royal family. They are at least 16.1 hands (1.65 metres) high and are chosen for their steady temperament and stamina.

Coaches & Livery
The Royal Mews houses the royal collection of historic carriages and coaches, which you may see in use during your visit. Among the vehicles on display are the Irish State Coach, in which The Queen travels to the State Opening of Parliament, and the Australian State Coach, which combines traditional craftsmanship with 20th-century technology to provide heating and remote-controlled windows.

The most dazzling vehicle of all is the Gold State Coach, which was built for George III in 1762.  Weighing almost four tonnes and requiring eight horses to pull it, it has carried every monarch to their coronation since 1821.

Visitors to the Royal Mews can also see some of the fine livery worn by The Queen’s coachmen. Apart from a few small details, it remains much the same as it was in Victorian times.  Remarkably, some of the tailors used for production of liveries today are the same companies employed during the reign of George III in the 18th century.

Audio guide is included in the admission price and is available in the following languages:English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Russian

 

Find out More about The State Rooms + Royal Mews

Windsor Castle – Standard Ticket

Windsor Castle – Standard Ticket

What to look out for at Windsor Castle

There’s so much to see at Windsor Castle, it’s hard to know where to begin! Here are some of our favourite attractions from the tour:
The State Apartments: Windsor Castle’s lavishly decorated State Apartments hold a large collection of fine art and paintings that are stunning to behold. If you visit between September and March, you’ll be able to explore the Semi-State Rooms, which were created for George VI and are now used by The Queen for official entertaining.

St George’s Chapel: In the grounds of Windsor Castle, you’ll find St. George’s Chapel, an active centre of worship, where Prince Edward was married and Henry VIII was laid to rest.
 
Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House: Another must-see attraction at Windsor Castle is Queen Mary’s world-famous Dolls’ House, complete with working lifts, water and electricity supply! It has its own library, full of original works by the top literary names of the day, as well as a beautiful garden and a wine cellar.

Changing the Guard: This spectacular ceremony begins as the Windsor Castle Guard line up outside the Guard Room, until a regimental band, corps of drums or pipe band heralds the entrance of the new Guard. This 45-minute ceremony is part of London’s patriotic culture and is the ultimate spectacle to witness when you visit Windsor Castle.

Windsor Castle facts

Windsor Castle was Queen Victoria’s main place of residence. After Prince Albert passed away, she was often referred to as ‘the Widow of Windsor’.

During World War II, the Royal Family secretly slept in Windsor Castle. The public believed they were sleeping in Buckingham Palace during this time.

There was a huge fire at Windsor Castle in November 1992, damaging more than 100 rooms. The restoration cost almost £40 million.

16 hours to move every clock forward when British Summer Time begins, and 18 hours to move them back again in the winter!clock makerThe Windsor Castle estate has more than 450 clocks. It takes the

The castle’s Great Kitchen is home to a whisk that can hold up to 250 eggs at a time, and the cellar holds around 18,000 bottles of wine.

The clocks in the Great Kitchen are always 5 minutes fast, so that the Queen’s food is never served late.

Tickets purchased through 365 Tickets cannot be upgraded to yearly passes
 

Windsor Castle, the largest and oldest occupied castle in the world, is one of the official residences of Her Majesty The Queen. The Castle’s dramatic site encapsulates 900 years of British history. It covers an area of 26 acres and contains, as well as a royal palace, a magnificent chapel and the homes and workplaces of a large number of people.

What there is to see:
The magnificent State Apartments are furnished with some of the finest works of art from the Royal Collection, including paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and the famous triple portrait of Charles I by Sir Anthony van Dyck.  In 1992 fire destroyed or damaged more than 100 rooms at the Castle. By good fortune the rooms worst affected were empty at the time, and as a result, few of the Castle’s artistic treasures were destroyed.  The highly acclaimed restoration work, completed in 1997, is a testament to the extraordinary skills of some of the finest craftsmen in Europe. From October to March visitors can also enjoy George IV’s private apartments (the Semi-State Rooms), among the most richly decorated interiors in the Castle.

St George’s Chapel is one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. It is the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter, the senior order of British Chivalry established in 1348 by Edward III. Within the chapel are the tombs of ten sovereigns, including Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour, and Charles I. Among the highlights of a visit to Windsor is Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, the most famous dolls’ house in the world.

Photographer Credits:

Image 1: Photographer: Mark Fiennes, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Image 2: Photographer: Dennis Gilbert, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Image 3: Photographer: Ian Jones, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Image 4: Photographer: John Freeman, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Find out More about Windsor Castle – Standard Ticket

Palace of Holyroodhouse – Queens Gallery

Palace of Holyroodhouse – Queens Gallery

The Queen’s Gallery was built in the shell of the former Holyrood Free Church and Duchess of Gordon’s School at the entrance to the Palace of Holyroodhouse. The buildings were constructed in the 1840s with funds from the Duchess of Gordon, but fell into disuse in the late 19th century.

Benjamin Tindall Architects were appointed project architects for the new Queen’s Gallery in October 1999. Their central visual theme was a celebration of The Queen’s Golden Jubilee, expressed through a series of arches and screens that lead visitors from the Gallery entrance to the exhibition spaces beyond. Their design complements the original 19th-century architecture, elements of which were incorporated into the new spaces. Unsympathetic later internal alterations were removed, and a new exposed steel and concrete floor inserted to reflect the original ‘gallery’ of the Church.  

A new stone arched entrance was created at the centre of the Horse Wynd frontage, opposite the new Scottish Parliament building. The use of a stone archway, with a courtyard beyond, is a traditional entrance device in Scottish architecture. The main walling is of Catcastle stone, the dressed work and lettering is of Stainton stone and the base is of Kenmay granite.

‘THE QUEEN’S GALLERY’ lettering above the entrance is the work of John Neilson, a calligrapher and carver. The letters were cut from single pieces of stone. Above sits Scotland’s heraldic lion, designed by Jill Watson. The lion sedant is based on a small red lion that sits at the feet of Mary, Queen of Scots on her tomb in Westminster Abbey. (The Palace of Holyroodhouse was once home to Mary, Queen of Scots.)  

The monumental entrance doors of oak have gilded bronze hinges by Jill Watson. Continuing the heraldic theme, the main hinges are decorated with the Scottish lion and unicorn. The beasts are set against the adjacent urban scene of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile and the rural scene of Arthur’s Seat and Salisbury Crags. The upper hinges are made as golden boughs of flowering native trees – chestnut and laburnum, oak, rowan and hawthorn.

The stone archway is decorated with a carved and gilded garland of Scottish flowers, including daisies and thistles, created by Graciela Ainsworth, an Edinburgh-based sculptor, carver and conservator. Over the old entrance to the former church is a stained-glass window by Christian Shaw.  The design shows a perspective drawing of the interior of a gallery.

At night, the shape of the archway is reflected by the glass lights by Keiko Mukaide set into the paving. The artist has given the tiles a water flow pattern, mirroring the stream of visitors walking in and out of the Gallery.

Inside, the reception desk by Hamid van Koten is made from curved pieces of Scottish elm with kilned glass and patinated copper. The pendant lights were designed and made in Edinburgh by Ingrid Phillips.

Dividing the reception from the main Gallery area is a patterned glass screen by Jacqueline Poncelet. The screen’s bronze handles by Jill Watson incorporate figures looking at art in a gallery.  

The dramatic central stair of native timber leads to the Gallery spaces above. The complex shape was designed by the architects with Charles Taylor Woodwork, who were responsible for the construction. Lights set into the first floor illuminate the curved balustrading.

The Queen’s Gallery was opened by Her Majesty The Queen on 29 November 2002, as part of the Golden Jubilee celebrations. It hosts a programme of changing exhibitions from the Royal Collection.

Find out More about Palace of Holyroodhouse – Queens Gallery