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Hampton Court Palace – Standard Ticket

Hampton Court Palace – Standard Ticket

Hampton Court Palace has provided a luxurious retreat for many of Britain’s most famous Kings and Queens. Henry VIII was so inspired by it that he spent three of his honeymoons here. And visitors continue to escape to Britain’s greatest palace to experience its history, splendour and stunning scale.

Discover what it was really like to live and work at Hampton Court Palace. Take a fascinating journey through 500 years of royal history. Marvel at the impressive architecture and opulent interiors of the State Apartments and see the vast Tudor Kitchens in full swing. Enjoy the breathtaking Great Hall and Chapel Royal, and see how Sir Christopher Wren transformed the palace to rival Versailles. Take time to appreciate one of the finest collections of Renaissance paintings in Europe, and listen to tales of intrigue at the royal court from expert guides dressed in full historical costume. Or enjoy an audio tour, available in 9 languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Russian, Korean and Japanese. They can be collected from the Information Centre in Clock Court.

And that’s before you’ve even begun to explore the stunning riverside gardens where you’ll find the famous Maze and one of the world’s oldest vines.

‘Top Ten’ things to see and do at Hampton Court. These sights are ‘unmissable’
Access to these sights is included in your admission ticket, unless otherwise stated.

 

Henry VIII’s Great Hall

The Great Hall is England’s greatest medieval hall and one of Britain’s oldest theatres. William Shakespeare’s company performed there in 1603-4.

Young Henry VIII exhibition Meet the ‘pin-up’ prince, before he became fat old Henry VIII, at our Young Henry VIII exhibition (included in your admission ticket). The exhibition includes paintings and interactive displays.
 

The world famous Maze

Test yourself and get enjoyably lost in ‘the most famous Maze in the history of the world’. Entry is included in your ‘All Palace and Gardens’ admission ticket. A ‘Maze only’ entry is also available.
 

Tudor kitchens and live Tudor cookery

Built to feed the Court of Henry VIII, the kitchens were expected to provide meals for 600 people twice a day. See the kitchens today and experience the sights and smells of a real Tudor kitchen!
 

Baroque Palace

The splendid apartments of William and Mary who ruled jointly at the end of the 17th century are a beautiful and elegant reminder of the decadent Baroque period.  They offer tremendous views of the magnificent gardens in particular the King’s Privy Garden, designed to be viewed from the most sort after location the King’s Privy Chamber.  
 

The Cumberland Art Gallery

Discover magnificent artworks from The Royal Collection in the Cumberland Art Gallery. See a selection of The Royal Collection’s finest paintings: masterpieces by Holbein, van Dyck, Rembrandt, Caravaggio, Bassano and Gainsborough, and other artists who worked for, or were collected by, four centuries of royal patrons.
 

Beautiful gardens

Wander through over 60 acres of beautifully maintained and internationally celebrated gardens at Hampton Court Palace. Entry is included in your ‘All Palace and Gardens’ admission ticket.
 

Family fun activities

We have a wide range of activities and tours to entertain families. Choose from family trails, our world-famous maze, costumed guided tours, live Tudor cookery and much much more.

 

The Chapel Royal

This beautiful chapel has been in continuous use for over 450 years. Visitors are welcome to attend religious services at The Chapel Royal.

 

Tiltyard café – kids’ meal deal!

History makes you hungry! At the Tiltyard café, choose from any kid’s hot meal with lemonade or milk and a fairy cake for just £3.95. Deliciously great value.

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The State Rooms + The Queen’s Gallery

The State Rooms + The Queen’s Gallery

The State Rooms

Buckingham Palace serves as both the office and London residence of Her Majesty The Queen, as well as the administrative headquarters of the Royal Household. It is one of the few working royal palaces remaining in the world today. Today the Buckingham Palace State Rooms are used extensively by Her Majesty The Queen and Members of the Royal Family to receive and entertain their guests on State, ceremonial and official occasions. During August and September when The Queen makes her annual visit to Scotland, the Palace’s nineteen state rooms are open to visitors.

What there is to see?
The Buckingham Palace State Rooms form the heart of the working palace and are lavishly furnished with some of the greatest treasures from the Royal Collection – paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens, Poussin and Canaletto; sculpture by Canova; exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain; and some of the finest English and French furniture.

In celebration of The Queen’s 90th birthday, a special exhibition will be staged across each of Her Majesty’s official residences during 2016.

Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe (30 July – 25 September 2016)

The Garden
Described as a ‘walled oasis in the middle of London’, the Palace’s garden is home to thirty different species of bird and more than 350 different wild flowers, some extremely rare. Visitors end their tour with a walk along the south side of the garden, with splendid views of the west front of the Palace and the famous lake.

Audio Guide
An audio guide is included in the ticket price and is available in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese, Russian and Mandarin. There is also a family audio guide (in English only) and accompanying activity trail, suitable for children 7-11 years.

Changing of the Guard
The Changing of the Guard ceremony takes place at 11:30 daily from April until the end of July and on alternate days for the rest of the year, weather permitting. The new guards arrive at the forecourt of the Palace at 11:30 from Wellington Barracks. The journey takes about 5 minutes and the soldiers are accompanied by a band. The ceremony is conducted on the Palace forecourt and takes approximately forty minutes to complete.

[The Army have not yet released the schedule for July, August or September.]

Wheelchair Access
If you require wheelchair access or the use of the lift, you should not book with 365 Tickets.com and should pre-book tickets directly with Buckingham Palace.
Access booking line: 020 7766 7324 www.royalcollection.org.uk or email specialistsales@royalcollection.org.uk

Find out More about The State Rooms + The Queen’s Gallery

The State Rooms + Royal Mews

The State Rooms + Royal Mews

Buckingham Palace State Rooms

Buckingham Palace serves as both the office and London residence of Her Majesty The Queen, as well as the administrative headquarters of the Royal Household. It is one of the few working royal palaces remaining in the world today. Today the Buckingham Palace State Rooms are used extensively by Her Majesty The Queen and Members of the Royal Family to receive and entertain their guests on State, ceremonial and official occasions. During August and September when The Queen makes her annual visit to Scotland, the Palace’s nineteen state rooms are open to visitors.

What there is to see?
The Buckingham Palace State Rooms form the heart of the working palace and are lavishly furnished with some of the greatest treasures from the Royal Collection – paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens, Poussin and Canaletto; sculpture by Canova; exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain; and some of the finest English and French furniture.

In celebration of The Queen’s 90th birthday, a special exhibition will be staged across each of Her Majesty’s official residences during 2016.

Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe (30 July – 25 September 2016)

The Garden
Described as a ‘walled oasis in the middle of London’, the Palace’s garden is home to thirty different species of bird and more than 350 different wild flowers, some extremely rare. Visitors end their tour with a walk along the south side of the garden, with splendid views of the west front of the Palace and the famous lake.

Audio Guide
An audio guide is included in the ticket price and is available in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese, Russian and Mandarin. There is also a family audio guide (in English only) and accompanying activity trail, suitable for children 7-11 years.

Changing of the Guard
The Changing of the Guard ceremony takes place at 11:30 daily from April until the end of July and on alternate days for the rest of the year, weather permitting. The new guards arrive at the forecourt of the Palace at 11:30 from Wellington Barracks. The journey takes about 5 minutes and the soldiers are accompanied by a band. The ceremony is conducted on the Palace forecourt and takes approximately forty minutes to complete.

[The Army have not yet released the schedule for July, August or September.]

Wheelchair Access
If you require wheelchair access or the use of the lift, you should not book with 365 Tickets.com and should pre-book tickets directly with Buckingham Palace.
Access booking line: 020 7766 7324 www.royalcollection.org.uk or email specialistsales@royalcollection.org.uk

 

The Royal Mews

 

What there is to see?

One of the finest working stables in existence, the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace provides a unique insight into the department of the Royal Household that provides transport by road for The Queen and other members of the Royal Family. 

The Carriage Horses
During your visit to the Mews, you will see some of The Queen’s horses that draw the coaches and carriages in the Mews.

The Cleveland Bays are used to escort newly appointed High Commissioners and Ambassadors to their audience with The Queen, when they present their formal credentials from their country’s Head of State.

You may also see the famous Windsor Greys, so called because they were kept at Windsor during the reign of Queen Victoria and drew the private carriages of the royal family. They are at least 16.1 hands (1.65 metres) high and are chosen for their steady temperament and stamina.

Coaches & Livery
The Royal Mews houses the royal collection of historic carriages and coaches, which you may see in use during your visit. Among the vehicles on display are the Irish State Coach, in which The Queen travels to the State Opening of Parliament, and the Australian State Coach, which combines traditional craftsmanship with 20th-century technology to provide heating and remote-controlled windows.

The most dazzling vehicle of all is the Gold State Coach, which was built for George III in 1762.  Weighing almost four tonnes and requiring eight horses to pull it, it has carried every monarch to their coronation since 1821.

Visitors to the Royal Mews can also see some of the fine livery worn by The Queen’s coachmen. Apart from a few small details, it remains much the same as it was in Victorian times.  Remarkably, some of the tailors used for production of liveries today are the same companies employed during the reign of George III in the 18th century.

Audio guide is included in the admission price and is available in the following languages:English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Russian

 

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Tower Bridge Exhibition + The Monument – Joint Ticket

Tower Bridge Exhibition + The Monument – Joint Ticket

TOWER BRIDGE
Over 100 years ago, the Victorians built a bridge that has become one of London’s most famous landmarks. High level walkways were built to allow people to cross the Thames whilst the Bridge was lifted to let tall ships sail past. Today these Walkways act as viewing galleries, giving visitors the most spectacular views across an ever changing London skyline.

Visitors enter Tower Bridge Exhibition via the North Tower. They are then transported by lift to the top of the Tower (47 metres above the Thames) where they have a unique opportunity to see the Bridge’s steel skeleton from within. A short film explains the history and provenance of the Bridge and then there is the chance to admire the spectacular views – from both covered Walkways. On the east Walkway there are fantastic views of the Docklands and from the west Walkway you can see the new GLA building, the Tower of London, St Paul’s, the city, the Pool of London and Big Ben and the London Eye in the distance. Interactive computerised kiosks and graphic panels explain the significance of the views to visitors, as well as providing more information on the history and building of the Bridge. The interactive material and graphic panels are written in seven languages and an audio loop for the hard of hearing is also in place for the video show.

There is another film to view in the South Tower before descending for the short walk to the historical Engine Rooms, included in your ticket price.

Victorian Engine Rooms
These provide a fascinating insight into late 19th century engineering. Installed for the completion of Tower Bridge in 1894, these huge, and beautifully maintained, coal-driven engines were used to power the thousands of bascule Bridge lifts performed until 1976. Although lifts are now operated by electricity, the original steam engines are still in place. The Engine Rooms give visitors a chance to experiment with models demonstrating the technology behind the Bridge. There are also some amazing photographs of the Bridge throughout its lifetime – including a revealing picture of the heavy steel structure of the Bridge as the stone cladding was installed over it.

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Urquhart Castle

Urquhart Castle

The magnificently situated Urquhart Castle, on the banks of Loch Ness, remains an impressive stronghold despite its ruinous state. 

Once one of Scotland’s largest castles, Urquhart’s remains include a tower house that commands splendid views of the famous loch and Great Glen.

Urquhart witnessed considerable conflict throughout its 500 years as a medieval fortress and its history from the 13th to 17th centuries was particularly bloody. Following Edward I’s invasion, it fell into English hands and was then reclaimed and lost again. In the 14th century, it figured prominently in the Scots’ struggle for independence and came under the control of Robert the Bruce after he became King of Scots. 

In the 15th and 16th centuries, the castle and glen were frequently raided from the west by the ambitious MacDonald Lords of the Isles.

The castle’s history and that of the noble families – Durward, MacDonald and Grant – who held it, is told in the exhibition and audio-visual display in the new visitor centre. The Centre features an outstanding array of medieval artefacts found at the castle. 

Visitors can relax in the café and visit the shop with its local crafts. The visitor centre contains retail, interpretation area, audio-visual presentation and tearoom and toilets on one level. Stunning views of the loch can be obtained from visitor centre veranda.

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Kensington Palace & Diana Her Fashion Story

Kensington Palace & Diana Her Fashion Story

Kensington Palace unveils a palace of secret stories and public lives. Visitors arrive through beautiful landscaped gardens evoking a past when Kensington was countryside. From the entrance hall start your journey through the magnificent Kings and Queen’s State Apartments. Filled with stories of two royal courts; the Stuarts and the Hanoverians, learn what you would have worn, how you should behave and how to succeed in the heady atmosphere of the palace state apartments.

The Queen’s State Apartments

Explore these intimate, private rooms created for Queen Mary II, who ruled jointly with her husband, King William III, in the 17th century. 

The Queen’s rooms

The Queen’s Staircase, little changed since its construction in 1690, is deliberately plainer than the King’s. Mary would have glided down its steps to reach her beloved gardens, created in the Dutch style, through the door at its foot.

At the top of the staircase is the Queen’s Gallery. Built in 1693, it was once filled with sumptuous artefacts including Turkish carpets, embroidered silk hangings and oriental porcelain. It was designed as a light and airy space for Mary to enjoy simple pastimes such as walking, reading and needlework.

The next door leads to the Queen’s Closet. It was in this room that Queen Anne, Mary’s younger sister, and her childhood friend and confidante, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, had a terrible argument in 1711.  Sarah and her husband were stripped of their high-rank positions and dismissed from court, which caused a shift of power between parliamentary factions.

The next room along is the Queen’s Dining Room which has beautiful panelling from the 17th century. It was a space where Mary and William could dine together, out of the public eye. They enjoyed dining modestly, on fish and beer.

Queen Mary was passionate about porcelain and filled the next room, her Drawing Room, with pieces from China and Japan. Visitors can also see William and Mary’s intertwined monogram in the beautifully carved cornice.

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