Notice: Undefined variable: post_type in /home/realbritaincompa/public_html/wp-content/plugins/all-in-one-seo-pack/aioseop_class.php on line 4181
Kew Gardens + Kew Explorer

Kew Gardens + Kew Explorer

Kew Gardens, is a World Heritage Site located in 121 hectares of stunning vistas with six magnificent glasshouses set in a beautiful landscape beside the River Thames between Richmond and KEW in south-west London. Kew Gardens represents more than 250 years of historical gardens. It is home to a remarkable collection of over 30,000 types of plants from all over the world that range from the decorative to the peculiar. Kew Gardens provide opportunities for public enjoyment and enrichment and the behind-the-scenes scientific work helps ensure a sustainable future for plants and people.

In the summer of 2004, Kew’s determination to make serious botany great fun for children was demonstrated with the opening of ‘Climbers and Creepers’. Bringing a new use to an old cycad house by White Peaks, Climbers and Creepers engages children from around 3-9 years in the pleasures of learning more about plants and their relationships with animals and people. Apart from the sheer beauty and tranquillity of the garden’s landscapes Kew offers a wonderful day out for all, whether horticulturally, historically or botanically inclined.

Botanical Highlights
The dates below are approximate, and flowering can vary by three to four weeks, depending on the weather.

Spring:
Mid-February – early March: A million-and-a-half crocuses below the Temple of Bellona between Victoria Gate and King William’s Temple – one of Kew’s most spectacular displays (typically late Feb – early March). Camellias between Victoria Gate and the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic Art. Spring bedding and spring flowers in the open woodland around the Azalea Garden. Daffodils, forsythia and cherry blossom.  Orchids, bromeliads and anthuriums in Kew’s Tropical Extravaganza, an annual display of exotic blooms in the Princess of Wales Conservatory.

April – May: Lilacs near Kew Palace and White Peaks. Spring bedding in front of the Palm House. Scillas in the Woodland Garden.  Flowering cherries, crab apples, magnolias and tulips throughout the gardens.

May – June: Bluebells in the Queen’s Cottage Grounds. Lilacs, azaleas, rhododendrons and magnolias, Brentford Gate area. The tiny but beautiful alpine flowers in the Davies Alpine House and the Rock Garden. Himalayan blue poppies and rhododendrons in the Woodland Garden. Native plants in long grass areas. Horse chestnut blossom.

Summer:
June – July: Summer flowers in the walled Duke’s Garden and in the Woodland Garden. Giant water lilies growing rapidly in the Princess of Wales Conservatory and the Waterlily House. The Mediterranean Garden near King William’s Temple. The Rose Pergola, the Rose Garden and the Order Beds. The Rock Garden. Tulip trees, opposite the Palm House, Philadelphus near the Pagoda.

July – September: Themed summer bedding in front of the Palm House. The Order Beds. Giant water lilies flowering in the Princess of Wales Conservatory. Water lilies flowering in the Aquatic Garden and Waterlily House. The herbasceous borders of the Duke’s Garden, fascinating medincinal herbs in the Queen’s Garden, Grass Garden, Rose Garden. Hibiscus, hydrangeas and Indian bean trees.

Autumn:
September – October: Autumn crocus in September in the Woodland Glade – Kew’s first burst of autumn colour. Belladonna lilies. Trees in autumn colour.

October – November: Last of the autumn colours. Grass Garden. Autumn-flowering crocuses, colchicums and hardy cyclamen. Strawberry trees west of King William’s Temple and between the Princess of Wales Conservatory and Rock Garden.

Winter:
November – December: Fruiting trees and shrubs, winter bark. Winter-flowering cherry.

January – February: Snowdrops in the Rock Garden and Conservation Area, crocuses along the Princess Walk. Witch hazels by King William’s Temple. Cornelian cherry in the winter border in the Duke’s Garden. Duchess border along wall outside the Duke’s Garden. Camellias between Victoria Gate and the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic Art. Clematis cirrhosa on the Rock Garden Wall. Rhododendrons in the Rhododendron Dell and, if the winter is mild, the carmine blooms of Magnolia campbellii might appear early. Shrubs in the Winter Border near the Ice House. The Davies Alpine House. Heathers, hellebores, viburnums and cornelian cherry.

Find out More about Kew Gardens + Kew Explorer

Kew Gardens + Kensington Palace

Kew Gardens + Kensington Palace

Kew Gardens, is a World Heritage Site located in 121 hectares of stunning vistas with six magnificent glasshouses set in a beautiful landscape beside the River Thames between Richmond and KEW in south-west London. Kew Gardens represents more than 250 years of historical gardens. It is home to a remarkable collection of over 30,000 types of plants from all over the world that range from the decorative to the peculiar. Kew Gardens provide opportunities for public enjoyment and enrichment and the behind-the-scenes scientific work helps ensure a sustainable future for plants and people.

In the summer of 2004, Kew’s determination to make serious botany great fun for children was demonstrated with the opening of ‘Climbers and Creepers’. Bringing a new use to an old cycad house by White Peaks, Climbers and Creepers engages children from around 3-9 years in the pleasures of learning more about plants and their relationships with animals and people. Apart from the sheer beauty and tranquillity of the garden’s landscapes Kew offers a wonderful day out for all, whether horticulturally, historically or botanically inclined.

Botanical Highlights
The dates below are approximate, and flowering can vary by three to four weeks, depending on the weather.

Spring:
Mid-February – early March: A million-and-a-half crocuses below the Temple of Bellona between Victoria Gate and King William’s Temple – one of Kew’s most spectacular displays (typically late Feb – early March). Camellias between Victoria Gate and the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic Art. Spring bedding and spring flowers in the open woodland around the Azalea Garden. Daffodils, forsythia and cherry blossom.  Orchids, bromeliads and anthuriums in Kew’s Tropical Extravaganza, an annual display of exotic blooms in the Princess of Wales Conservatory.

April – May: Lilacs near Kew Palace and White Peaks. Spring bedding in front of the Palm House. Scillas in the Woodland Garden.  Flowering cherries, crab apples, magnolias and tulips throughout the gardens.

May – June: Bluebells in the Queen’s Cottage Grounds. Lilacs, azaleas, rhododendrons and magnolias, Brentford Gate area. The tiny but beautiful alpine flowers in the Davies Alpine House and the Rock Garden. Himalayan blue poppies and rhododendrons in the Woodland Garden. Native plants in long grass areas. Horse chestnut blossom.

Summer:
June – July: Summer flowers in the walled Duke’s Garden and in the Woodland Garden. Giant water lilies growing rapidly in the Princess of Wales Conservatory and the Waterlily House. The Mediterranean Garden near King William’s Temple. The Rose Pergola, the Rose Garden and the Order Beds. The Rock Garden. Tulip trees, opposite the Palm House, Philadelphus near the Pagoda.

July – September: Themed summer bedding in front of the Palm House. The Order Beds. Giant water lilies flowering in the Princess of Wales Conservatory. Water lilies flowering in the Aquatic Garden and Waterlily House. The herbasceous borders of the Duke’s Garden, fascinating medincinal herbs in the Queen’s Garden, Grass Garden, Rose Garden. Hibiscus, hydrangeas and Indian bean trees.

Autumn:
September – October: Autumn crocus in September in the Woodland Glade – Kew’s first burst of autumn colour. Belladonna lilies. Trees in autumn colour.

October – November: Last of the autumn colours. Grass Garden. Autumn-flowering crocuses, colchicums and hardy cyclamen. Strawberry trees west of King William’s Temple and between the Princess of Wales Conservatory and Rock Garden.

Winter:
November – December: Fruiting trees and shrubs, winter bark. Winter-flowering cherry.

January – February: Snowdrops in the Rock Garden and Conservation Area, crocuses along the Princess Walk. Witch hazels by King William’s Temple. Cornelian cherry in the winter border in the Duke’s Garden. Duchess border along wall outside the Duke’s Garden. Camellias between Victoria Gate and the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic Art. Clematis cirrhosa on the Rock Garden Wall. Rhododendrons in the Rhododendron Dell and, if the winter is mild, the carmine blooms of Magnolia campbellii might appear early. Shrubs in the Winter Border near the Ice House. The Davies Alpine House. Heathers, hellebores, viburnums and cornelian cherry.

Find out More about Kew Gardens + Kensington Palace

Kew Gardens + Hampton Court Palace

Kew Gardens + Hampton Court Palace

Kew Gardens, is a World Heritage Site located in 121 hectares of stunning vistas with six magnificent glasshouses set in a beautiful landscape beside the River Thames between Richmond and KEW in south-west London. Kew Gardens represents more than 250 years of historical gardens. It is home to a remarkable collection of over 30,000 types of plants from all over the world that range from the decorative to the peculiar. Kew Gardens provide opportunities for public enjoyment and enrichment and the behind-the-scenes scientific work helps ensure a sustainable future for plants and people.

In the summer of 2004, Kew’s determination to make serious botany great fun for children was demonstrated with the opening of ‘Climbers and Creepers’. Bringing a new use to an old cycad house by White Peaks, Climbers and Creepers engages children from around 3-9 years in the pleasures of learning more about plants and their relationships with animals and people. Apart from the sheer beauty and tranquillity of the garden’s landscapes Kew offers a wonderful day out for all, whether horticulturally, historically or botanically inclined.

Botanical Highlights
The dates below are approximate, and flowering can vary by three to four weeks, depending on the weather.

Spring:
Mid-February – early March: A million-and-a-half crocuses below the Temple of Bellona between Victoria Gate and King William’s Temple – one of Kew’s most spectacular displays (typically late Feb – early March). Camellias between Victoria Gate and the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic Art. Spring bedding and spring flowers in the open woodland around the Azalea Garden. Daffodils, forsythia and cherry blossom.  Orchids, bromeliads and anthuriums in Kew’s Tropical Extravaganza, an annual display of exotic blooms in the Princess of Wales Conservatory.

April – May: Lilacs near Kew Palace and White Peaks. Spring bedding in front of the Palm House. Scillas in the Woodland Garden.  Flowering cherries, crab apples, magnolias and tulips throughout the gardens.

May – June: Bluebells in the Queen’s Cottage Grounds. Lilacs, azaleas, rhododendrons and magnolias, Brentford Gate area. The tiny but beautiful alpine flowers in the Davies Alpine House and the Rock Garden. Himalayan blue poppies and rhododendrons in the Woodland Garden. Native plants in long grass areas. Horse chestnut blossom.

Summer:
June – July: Summer flowers in the walled Duke’s Garden and in the Woodland Garden. Giant water lilies growing rapidly in the Princess of Wales Conservatory and the Waterlily House. The Mediterranean Garden near King William’s Temple. The Rose Pergola, the Rose Garden and the Order Beds. The Rock Garden. Tulip trees, opposite the Palm House, Philadelphus near the Pagoda.

July – September: Themed summer bedding in front of the Palm House. The Order Beds. Giant water lilies flowering in the Princess of Wales Conservatory. Water lilies flowering in the Aquatic Garden and Waterlily House. The herbasceous borders of the Duke’s Garden, fascinating medincinal herbs in the Queen’s Garden, Grass Garden, Rose Garden. Hibiscus, hydrangeas and Indian bean trees.

Autumn:
September – October: Autumn crocus in September in the Woodland Glade – Kew’s first burst of autumn colour. Belladonna lilies. Trees in autumn colour.

October – November: Last of the autumn colours. Grass Garden. Autumn-flowering crocuses, colchicums and hardy cyclamen. Strawberry trees west of King William’s Temple and between the Princess of Wales Conservatory and Rock Garden.

Winter:
November – December: Fruiting trees and shrubs, winter bark. Winter-flowering cherry.

January – February: Snowdrops in the Rock Garden and Conservation Area, crocuses along the Princess Walk. Witch hazels by King William’s Temple. Cornelian cherry in the winter border in the Duke’s Garden. Duchess border along wall outside the Duke’s Garden. Camellias between Victoria Gate and the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic Art. Clematis cirrhosa on the Rock Garden Wall. Rhododendrons in the Rhododendron Dell and, if the winter is mild, the carmine blooms of Magnolia campbellii might appear early. Shrubs in the Winter Border near the Ice House. The Davies Alpine House. Heathers, hellebores, viburnums and cornelian cherry.

Find out More about Kew Gardens + Hampton Court Palace